15th October 1839 – Diary Entry’s – Victoria And Albert Become Engaged 


Transcription of the entry for the 15th October 1839 in Queen Victoria’s journal. This was the day that Victoria proposed to the love of her life, Prince Albert, at Windsor Castle. 

Saw my dear Cousins return safely from hunting. Wrote letters, & saw Esterhazy. — At about ½ p. 12, I sent for Albert, who came to the Closet, where I was alone, & after a few minutes I said, I thought he must be aware why I wished him & his brother to come here, & that it would make me too happy if he would consent to what I wanted (that he should marry me). We embraced each other over & over again & he was so kind & so affectionate. 

To feel I am loved by such an angel as Albert, is too great a happiness to describe, & I really felt it was the happiest & brightest moment in my life, which made up for all I had suffered & endured. I cannot say how I adore him & I shall strive to make him feel as little as possible the great sacrifice he is making. I told him I realized it was a sacrifice, which he would not allow. I then spoke of the great necessity of keeping our engagement a secret, excepting to his father, Uncle Leopold & Stockmar, to whom he said he would send a courier next day, also explaining that the marriage would have to be as early as the beginning of February. I asked Albert to fetch Ernest, which he did, & the latter congratulated us both warmly, & seemed very pleased, I feel the happiest of human beings. 

Ernest then said to me how perfect his brother was, & we talked so comfortably & happily together, till past 1, when I sent them off, & Ld Melbourne came to me. After talking of some appointments, I said I must tell him that I had got well through the interview with Albert, & that he had said he would let no one perceive that anything between us had taken place, — that he seemed very happy, as well as his brother, though the latter observed he was the only looser by our marriage, as his brother had always been everything to him. Ld M. remarked “You will now be able to do much more what you like.” He also said that Ld John Russell’s only wish was that I should be happy, which I answered I had not a doubt of. Talked of whether I should make Albert a Peer or not, but certainly Royal Highness.

We discussed the Household he would require to have & of taking the Pce of Wales’s Household, (formed in 1783) as a guide, as well as those of Queen Mary’s husband Philip of Spain, & Pce George of Denmark, &c. The necessity there was for Albert’s taking precedence of all the Princes, as my Husband. — Lunched with Mama & my dear Cousins, & afterwards wrote. At 4 I walked out with them, Ld Melbourne, Ly Tavistock (who with Ly Caroline Barrington, has came into waiting today) & the other ladies. We walked down to Adelaide Cottage & back. — Wrote to Uncle Leopold, Uncle Ernest, & Stockmar, about my great happiness, & then wrote my Journal. — Our dinner party was the same with the exception of Esterhazy, Uxbridge, & his girls & Alvensleben, & with the addition of Ld John Russell, & Miss Lister. Ernest led me in, & I sat between him & Ld Melbourne. 

Ernest talked to me a good deal of dearest Albert, — his great excellence & steadiness, of his never having been in love before, which he justly observed was a great deal for a young man. When we were sealed after dinner, I had my precious Albert beside me, & Ld M. joined us. Ernest played at Chess & Albert & I played at “Tactics”. We stayed up till ¼ p. 11.

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The Princess Royal’s Wedding photograph

Queen Victoria, Prince Albert and The Princess Royal, Victoria pose in the outfits they wore to the princesses wedding on the 25th January 1858. This picture was actually taken a few days prior to the wedding in preparation. The figure of Queen Victoria is blurred because she moved during the exposure period.

Queen Victoria’s Pink Silk Parasol

Beautiful pink silk and Honiton lace parasol, featuring an enamel hand wearing a bracelet inscribed with the words ‘I GOVERN’, acting as the opening mechanism.

Thought to have been presented to Queen Victoria at the opening of Prince Alberts Great Exhibition on the 1st of May 1851.

Royal Collection

Queen Victoria and Prince Albert’s Wedding Cake

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When Queen Victoria and Prince Albert were married on the 10th of February 1840, their wedding was going to be nothing short of a great sceptical – and their cake was no different.

Their circular cake weighed 300 pounds and had a circumference of about 3 metres. At its highest point it was decorated with figures of Queen Victoria and Prince Albert dressed in ancient Greek costume, and was ornamented with orange blossom and sprigs of myrtle entwined together. The cake was served at a wedding breakfast at Buckingham Palace. Despite its massive size, more than one cake was baked for the wedding as pieces were to be distributed to many, many people.

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It is probably due to this that, incredibly, a piece of the cake and its packaging has survived to this day. The cake, exhibited some years ago at Windsor Castle, has recently fetched £1,500 pounds at auction. Its presentation box, inscribed with “The Queen’s Bridal Cake Buckingham Palace, Feby 10, 1840”, was also sold with the cake, along with Queen Victoria’s signature on its papers.

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Surprisingly, many wedding cakes over the last few decades and centuries have survived, with cake from brides such as Princess Louise in 1871, Princess Elizabeth in 1947 and Princess Diana in 1981 all surviving to today.

Queen Victoria’s Privy Council Dress

Queen Victoria’s Privy Council dress and removable white cotton embroidered collar (see detail), worn on the day of her accession on the 20th June 1837. Originally black (because Victoria would have been in morning for her now dead uncle King William IV), over time the silk dress has now faded to this strange brown colour. The dress has been repeatedly recreated for film and television, in screen portrays such as The Young Victoria and Victoria (see below)

Queen Victoria’s Wedding Veil – Photograph

Amazing photograph of Queen Victoria’s wedding veil and preserved wreath of orange blossom flowers, worn by Victoria during her wedding ceremony to Prince Albert on the 10th February 1840. This photograph is amazing because Victoria was buried wearing the veil, so it hasn’t been seen for over a century.

Royal Collection